The maltings & maltings cottage

THE MALTINGS

Two photographs of The Maltings taken in the 1930’s. Note the higher roof level in the picture on the right illustrating changes made to the property.In 1796, when John Millburn from Wingrave came to Hardwick as Parish Clerk and Schoolmaster he met a Mr Brooks, Maltster and married his daughter Anne. They had eleven children, all but two living to maturity. Two of their sons George and Joseph also became Parish Clerk and Schoolmaster.

Until 1917 the property was owned by Sir Anthony Rothschild of Aston Clinton. After a succession of owners, Miss Phyllis Stewart, (of Stewart Liberty’s department store) purchased the house and adjoining land in 1933. The house has undergone many structural alterations since that time.In 1934 Miss Stewart purchased Maltings Cottage and retained ownership of both properties up to her death. The properties were bequeathed to Nan Davis (neice) who moved to Hardwick with her family in 1972 (Nan married Charles Edward Davis in Hardwick church in 1944).

Two photographs of The Maltings taken in the 1930’s. Note the higher roof level in the picture on the right illustrating changes made to the property.Nan’s son Edward, bought Maltings Cottage and lived there from 1976 to 1985. In 1984 Edward married Louise Bridgman in Hardwick church and in 1985 they moved to the Maltings. Edward’s mother had extensive changes made to Maltings Cottage and lived there from 1985 to 2006. She died in 2009.

Two photographs of The Maltings taken in the 1930’s. Note the higher roof level in the picture on the right illustrating changes made to the property.

 MALTINGS COTTAGE

Relaxing outside the Maltings in the 1930’s

Relaxing outside the Maltings in the 1930’s

The present cottage is probably where the malt was stored. If you look carefully at the front of the building, just above the front door, the outline of a much older door can be seen in the brickwork. It is likely that sacks were hauled up through here and stored in the loft space until required.

The 1881 Census shows the road passing east to west as Maltings Lane, which has since become Lower Road.

On Lower Road, at the northeast corner of the village, stands a small brick built memorial to the dead of World War 1. It is believed that Rev. James Arthur Hervey, then living at the Maltings, commissioned the erection in memory of his son killed in France. The Rector at that time, Francis Edwin Allan MA, also had a son killed in France during this period. The  memorial is possibly a joint mark of respect and remembrance.